Occ Health Safety & Performance

The new Occupational Health, Safety and Performance SIG will integrate the strong academic and clinical background of the Australasian Sleep Association with the experience of health and safety and industry professionals. This will provide a fertile opportunity to share ideas across disciplines, promote Association input to policy and optimise sleep health in industry. Whilst a number of members provide active input to occupational health and safety in industry the SIG will strengthen input from the Association into this important area, improving the translation of science into practice and helping the scientific community to understand operational and implementation opportunities and challenges in industrial settings. In addition to inviting ASA members to participate we will actively seek involvement from industry and the occupational health and safety community.

The SIG will enable these groups to:

  • Share information and knowledge
  • Develop joint industry and academic projects
  • Educate industry and the workforce
  • Increase awareness and public health knowledge
  • Reduce accidents and illness
  • Pool resources to combat shared issues
  • Provide input to government policy and industry groups on a national and international level

This SIG will complement existing special interest groups within the ASA and indeed need to draw upon expertise from a range of disciplines. It will provide opportunities for translational research and major public health benefit, assisting us to achieve our vision and mission. It is an opportune time to combine scientific and industrial strengths to improve the health of all Australians at work, at play or at rest.  

Latest News

  • The maths to a healthy sleep and how to calculate what you need

    30th Mar 15

    According to a recent Sleep Health Foundation study, around 30 per cent of Australians complain of insufficient sleep on a daily or near-daily basis.

    Chair Professor David Hillman said a lack of sleep or too much of the wrong sort of sleep was causing the issue.

    "The big national problem is not enough sleep rather than too much, although there are exceptions to that," he told 702 ABC Sydney's Dominic Knight.

    more >

  • Cognitive Strategies in the Treatment of Insomnia: Why and When?

    19th Mar 15

    Registration for the next ASA webinar is now open! The webinar will be presented by Dr Melissa Ree.

    For more information click here

    more >

  • Drinking alcohol before going to sleep reduces chances of feeling rest

    17th Mar 15

    Although drinking alcohol before bed can induce drowsiness, it is proven to disrupt the quality of rest and have negative effects on brain function the next day, according to new research.

    Scientists say that, although drinking alcohol can act as a sedative, it can increase activity in the frontal section of the brain and hamper the chances of deep restorative sleep.

    more >