Dental Orofacial Special Interest Group

Mission

To facilitate a coordinated multidisciplinary approach between clinicians and scientists interested in the structure and function of the upper airway and dental aspects of sleep disorders, including treatment, to promote collaborative education, research and clinical practice.


Broad Objective

  1. To foster the exchange of information and collaboration in research among clinicians and scientists broadly interested in upper airway structure and function, oral biology and dental aspects of sleep disorders and their treatment, encompassing (but not restricted to) the disciplines of respiratory and sleep medicine, dentistry and its subspecialties, otorhinolaryngology and maxillofacial surgery.
  2. To serve as a resource group to the Australasian Sleep Association Board and its subcommittees in the provision of specialised expertise related to dental aspects of sleep disorders, development of position papers and education material.
  3. To contribute to the planning of Annual Scientific Meetings.

Oral Sleep Medicine Course 2014

The 7th Annual Oral Sleep Medicine Course will be held from 6-8 October 2014 at the Perth Convention Centre.

More information coming soon..


Documents

Dental Appliance Therapy for the treatment of sleep-disordered breathing [PDF]

A Position paper of the Australasian Sleep Association regarding the use of Oral Appliances in the treatment of Snoring AND Obstructive Sleep Apnoea [PDF]

Oral Appliances for sleep apnoea [PDF]

Survey of Australian & New Zealand Dentists [PDF]


Additional Information

Health Professionals Information [link]

Sleep Health Foundation Oral Appliances Information Sheet [link]

Latest News

  • Cognitive Strategies in the Treatment of Insomnia: Why and When?

    19th Mar 15

    Registration for the next ASA webinar is now open! The webinar will be presented by Dr Melissa Ree.

    For more information click here

    more >

  • Drinking alcohol before going to sleep reduces chances of feeling rest

    17th Mar 15

    Although drinking alcohol before bed can induce drowsiness, it is proven to disrupt the quality of rest and have negative effects on brain function the next day, according to new research.

    Scientists say that, although drinking alcohol can act as a sedative, it can increase activity in the frontal section of the brain and hamper the chances of deep restorative sleep.

    more >

  • Melatonin and Children

    16th Mar 15

    Woolcock Institute of Medical Research paediatric sleep specialist Dr Chris Seton said melatonin was a better alternative to the antidepressants and blood pressure medication that some parents are using and which caused severe side effects.

    Australasian Sleep Association board member Sadasivam Suresh said studies had been conducted into melatonin and none had found it to be unsafe, but more evidence into its long term effects was needed. As a paediatrician, he prescribed it for short-term use.

    more >